Subscribe
RSS

Watch Me Live On

Periscope

@RoxanneCrouse

 

 
 

 

 

Read For Free

Want a Self-Published Book Reviewed?
Read My Policies

 

Archive
January February March April May June July August (1) September (2) October (18) November (4) December (12)
January (4) February (9) March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June (2) July (2) August (1) September (1) October November December (3)
January February March April (1) May (1) June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December

Dark Whimsical Art Blog
 

Art and Creativity for the strange and unusual.
 

I'm Just Going to Write and Think of a Title Later #amwriting #darkart #adultcoloringbook

May 24, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

The Writer That Doesn't Write

Yup, that's me. I haven't written anything real in years now. I don't know what happened. The desire to write just went away. I guess I'm too absorbed in art right now. I do have something exciting happening on October 1st, but I'm not sure if I'm allowed to talk about it yet so I won't. You'll just have to wait. I like how many times I just used the word just. If I was editing your work I'd be yelling at you for that. But it's the way I talk, so in my blog posts you'll just have to deal with it. Ha ha.

Adult Coloring Book News

I have been thinking about working on my novel Believe again, but I must finish my adult coloring book first. I have fifteen pages done. I'm making great progress. The more I work on it the better I think it is getting.  I could be fooling myself but I guess I'll find out soon when I get everything finished. Here are the pages so far. Tell me in the comments what you think. Would you want to color these? What else do you think I should draw. It is hard to come up with ideas. I may not be the best illustrator but I don't care. I'm going to finish this and put it out no matter how bad it might be. I love it and I enjoy doing it. Drawing makes the time at work go by so much faster. 

Page 1 peacockPage 1 peacock Page 2 Saturn's MoonPage 2 Saturn's Moon Page 5 Lost TeddyPage 5 Lost Teddy Page 4 MushroomsPage 4 Mushrooms Page 3 Skull ChaosPage 3 Skull Chaos Page 6 April Shows Eyeball FlowersPage 6 April Shows Eyeball Flowers Page 7 Eyeball TreePage 7 Eyeball Tree Page 8 PhoenixPage 8 Phoenix Page 9 Pumpkin HousePage 9 Pumpkin House Page 11 What's in the BoxPage 11 What's in the Box Page 10 Rose on leavesPage 10 Rose on leaves Page 12 Chinese DragonPage 12 Chinese Dragon Page 13 Scary ToysPage 13 Scary Toys Page 14 Hungry CrowPage 14 Hungry Crow Page 15 Death Head Moths on FlowersPage 15 Death Head Moths on Flowers


I'm Back and I'm Working on a Dark Whimsical Adult Coloring Book #adultcoloringbook

April 03, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

So I have neglected my blog for far too long. I've been making a huge life change from being a wedding photographer to being a fine arts photographer and artist. So I had to get a full time job because bills won't wait for my art to start selling. I'm working a few days a week at a Hotel and a few days a week at an art retail store and that is sucking up a lot of my time. 

So enough with the boring stuff. While I'm waiting for "inspiration" I decided to challenge my son to an art contest. He is very talented and has a lot of time on his hands and it just eats my insides watching him waste it playing video games and sleeping all day. I don't know what's wrong with these millennials. So to get a fire under his butt I said that I bet I could create a 48 page adult coloring book before he could, even while working forty hours a week.  

So far I have two pages completed and eight penciled out. I tried drawing directly in photoshop with a wacom bamboo and I hate it. So I am drawing with pencil, inking it in, and then scanning it. Then I add extra stuff in photoshop. Hopefully I get used to the wacom at some point and can start skipping a few steps. But here are the first two finished pages. Drum roll please!

Page 2 Saturn's MoonPage 2 Saturn's Moon Page 1 peacockPage 1 peacock

I know I'm not the worlds best illustrator and there are artists far better than me. But guess what. I don't care. I know somewhere out there someone will like my work. So person, whoever you are, this is for you my friend and no one else.

So where  am I learning to do this awesome stuff you ask. A lot of it learned FROM WATCHING YOU. Sorry, bad joke. Actually, there are two main sources so far. 

One: Is a website called Control Paint. A resource of free and paid videos on how to draw and paint in photoshop. These videos are awesome and I'm slowly working my way through all of them. This guy does not pay me. I just really love his videos.

Two: A book on drawing called How to Draw Cool Stuff. You can get this book for free on Kindle. Or you can buy a physical copy. This is an affiliate link so I do get a small amount of money if you click and buy which helps pay the $250 I owe for this site each year.

It's time for me to get back to work inking. I've got to stay ahead of the child. Mom's got to prove her point!

 


The Poor Art Collector’s Guide to Buying Art #art #artinfo

November 23, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

Do you have a desire to fill your home with beautiful original artwork but you don’t have much money? Are mass-produced low quality Chinese made “wall art” not good enough for you? Maybe you’ve gone to the big galleries in New York and have fallen in love with a piece of art only to fall to the floor when you saw the price. After that experience it might seem impossible, but you can own original art and it only cost between $100 to $500 per piece, maybe even less in some cases. You just need to know where to look.

1. Look for new emerging artists. Because they don’t have a reputation yet, new artists tend to sell their work at very reasonable prices. Look locally first. You would be surprised at the talent in your own back yard. You never know. The artist down the street may end up being the next Salvador Dali. There are artists like Lauren Hoffman, a mixed media artist, not yet discovered but who’s work is worth checking out.

2. Buy from galleries that specialize in new artists. Galleries in small towns tend to represent local and new artists so don’t go to the big city looking for art deals. You won’t find them. You can try places like The Fine Arts Company located in Hagerstown MD.

3. Don’t worry whether the piece will be worth anything. Buy it because you love it. Everyone hopes to discover a long-lost Picasso in their attic, but the chances are that isn’t going to happen. The chances are the same that the painting you just bought from a new artist will be worth millions some day. So don’t worry about its possible worth. Buy pieces for your collection because they move you in some way.

4. Buy signed and numbered prints instead of originals. Original art may have more value in the long run, but will cost a lot more. Many artists will offer limited edition prints of the original and will embellish the print in some way adding to the value of the print. The smaller the edition number the better, but that will also raise the price.

11108832_399643493553107_5104205788158554267_n5. Go to the openings of new artists. Sometimes they have great deals on their work. The hardest part of an artist opening is getting people in the door. Many artists will offer deals on their work to encourage people to come. Sometimes they will even give away free prints to a select few.

6. Try flea markets, community yard sales, and local craft shows. Many beginning artists start out at these venues because they are plentiful and inexpensive to participate in. They are also close to home so there are no travel expenses for the artist. You can find some amazing work at these events at very reasonable prices.

7. Check into your local art groups. There might be some great artists out there too shy to make the leap to selling their art in a professional atmosphere. Join some local art groups and you may find them and be able to acquire their work at phenomenal prices.

8. Buy pieces you like from etsy, ebay, and other websites that sell art. There is a lot of competition on these websites. New artists have to price competitively to survive or their work won’t get noticed. You may find some great deals.

9. Local coffee houses and book stores sometimes sell the art of local artists. These types of establishments often don’t charge to display at in their stores and sometimes don’t even take a cut if a piece sales. This makes them popular places for new artists to approach. So get a cup of joe and see what art you can find for a good price.

10. While on vacation check out the local shopping instead of the big chain stores. Local tourist places love to sell local crafts and art, especially if it is related to the destination in some way. So you may find many undiscovered artists in these local shops at prices you can afford.

 


Bring Back MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER 3000 #BringBackMST3K

November 12, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

Help Bring Back MST3K one of the most beloved cult television series ever, for a new season of up to 12 feature-length episodes! I love this show and still watch it today and want to see it come back! This has to happen. Click the link and help it happen. 

Bring Back MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER 3000

If you've never seen it check out this link to Werewolf one of my favorite episodes


Fourteen Dos and Don’ts When Approaching An Art Gallery to Sell Your Work #artinfo

November 09, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

Want to see your artwork hanging in galleries? What artist wouldn’t. But there is a right way and a wrong way to approach gallery owners and curators. If you approach them the wrong way it won’t matter how good your art is. They won’t want to represent you.  To get you on the right track here’s a list of 7 dos and 7 don’ts when trying to  get your art on the walls of galleries.

1. Don’t look for galleries to represent your work before you’ve sold any on your own. The gallery will want to know where your work as shown before, how much you have sold, and if you have won any awards. If haven’t sold any of your work yet then you are jumping ahead. Do some art fairs. Small local ones count. Keep a list of everything you sell.

 

2. Do get out there and sell at craft shows, yard sales, juried art shows, any where you can to prove your work is sellable to a gallery. Don’t forget online, too, at places like Etsy, ebay, Art America, or Amazon.  Keep a list of everything you sell and where your work has been displayed. If your work wins any awards record that as well. Think of this information as your resume. To the gallery it will be proof your work is sellable.

3. Don’t assume that all galleries sell every type of art. They don’t. Some specialize in photography, some in paintings only. It will do you no good and waste the time of the gallery if you do black and white photography and the gallery specializes in oil paintings. Do your homework. Only submit to galleries that are appropriate.

4. Do research galleries and visit them to see what type of art they represent before contacting them. Visit their webpage if they are too far away to visit in person.  See if they have any calls for artists or specific times of the year they review portfolios. Find out how they prefer to be approached and how they want your work to be presented.

5. Don’t show up at the art gallery with all of your work without an appointment. Gallery owners and curators are busy and normally have specific times they meet artists. Nothing frustrates a gallery owner more than an artist who shows up with all their work demanding to be seen. Don’t be this type of artist.

6. Do research the galleries that represent the type of work you do to find out how and when they like to be contacted by new artists. On most gallery websites you will find information on how to be considered for the gallery.  At The Fine Arts Company where I work we have a form for the artists to fill out before coming in. Here’s a link to our form: Call For Artists

7. Don’t call, email, or visit a gallery (unless your shopping) that you have submitted to asking whether they are interested or not. Again, gallery owners and curators are busy people. They don’t have time to respond back to every artist inquiry, only the ones they are interested in.

8. Do wait for the gallery to contact you, and if they don’t, assume they are not interested. Yes, if they don’t contact you back they are not interested in your work. It doesn’t mean your work is bad. It means your work may not fit the gallery or they may already have a similar artist and don’t want more work that looks the same.

9. Don’t make it hard for a gallery to find you and see your work. Most galleries to save time want to be able to view your work online. They don’t have time to meet every artist in person . They will be more likely to consider you if you have a presence online. Galleries sometimes search the internet looking for new talent. They won’t find you if you aren’t on the web.

10. Do have a strong presence on the internet and do juried shows, and craft fairs to show that your work can sell. There are so many free places you can display your work online. There is no excuse for not having a web presence. If you don’t understand computers and don’t want to take the time to learn then hire someone to create a web presence for you. Ask your kids, nieces, or nephews. Chances are someone in your family can help you out.

11. Don’t show up with your work still wet or not ready to hang. This will make you look very unprofessional. The gallery doesn’t have time to get your work ready for display for you. You need to do your homework ahead of time and only bring work that is completed. An oil painting needs six months to dry so you’re going to have to wait.

12. Do check the galleries website, or email and ask, for mounting and framing requirements to hang your work. Some galleries will require all pieces to have wire for hanging. Some will require sawtooth. Some may only take pieces on canvas, no frames. It’s your job to find out ahead of time and have your work ready when asked to bring it in. We like all of our work to be matted and framed with wire on the back for hanging unless your work is on canvas. The canvas will still need hanging wire on the back.

13. Don’t leave your work with any gallery without a contract. What happens if your work disappears? What if it sells? How much do you get? Who knows without a contract. It doesn’t matter what the gallery verbally told you. You need it in writing.

14. Do bring your own contract or read over the galleries and make sure everything is written down that is agreed upon. The contract should have everyone’s contact info, what works you are leaving, what their prices are, what percentage of the sale the gallery will be keeping, when will you get paid for each sale, what happens if a piece is damaged or stolen. You get the picture. Spell out everything so there is no difficulty between you and the gallery.

Follow these tips and you’ll look like a pro and have no trouble getting your work into galleries.