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The Poor Art Collector’s Guide to Buying Art #art #artinfo

November 23, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

Do you have a desire to fill your home with beautiful original artwork but you don’t have much money? Are mass-produced low quality Chinese made “wall art” not good enough for you? Maybe you’ve gone to the big galleries in New York and have fallen in love with a piece of art only to fall to the floor when you saw the price. After that experience it might seem impossible, but you can own original art and it only cost between $100 to $500 per piece, maybe even less in some cases. You just need to know where to look.

1. Look for new emerging artists. Because they don’t have a reputation yet, new artists tend to sell their work at very reasonable prices. Look locally first. You would be surprised at the talent in your own back yard. You never know. The artist down the street may end up being the next Salvador Dali. There are artists like Lauren Hoffman, a mixed media artist, not yet discovered but who’s work is worth checking out.

2. Buy from galleries that specialize in new artists. Galleries in small towns tend to represent local and new artists so don’t go to the big city looking for art deals. You won’t find them. You can try places like The Fine Arts Company located in Hagerstown MD.

3. Don’t worry whether the piece will be worth anything. Buy it because you love it. Everyone hopes to discover a long-lost Picasso in their attic, but the chances are that isn’t going to happen. The chances are the same that the painting you just bought from a new artist will be worth millions some day. So don’t worry about its possible worth. Buy pieces for your collection because they move you in some way.

4. Buy signed and numbered prints instead of originals. Original art may have more value in the long run, but will cost a lot more. Many artists will offer limited edition prints of the original and will embellish the print in some way adding to the value of the print. The smaller the edition number the better, but that will also raise the price.

11108832_399643493553107_5104205788158554267_n5. Go to the openings of new artists. Sometimes they have great deals on their work. The hardest part of an artist opening is getting people in the door. Many artists will offer deals on their work to encourage people to come. Sometimes they will even give away free prints to a select few.

6. Try flea markets, community yard sales, and local craft shows. Many beginning artists start out at these venues because they are plentiful and inexpensive to participate in. They are also close to home so there are no travel expenses for the artist. You can find some amazing work at these events at very reasonable prices.

7. Check into your local art groups. There might be some great artists out there too shy to make the leap to selling their art in a professional atmosphere. Join some local art groups and you may find them and be able to acquire their work at phenomenal prices.

8. Buy pieces you like from etsy, ebay, and other websites that sell art. There is a lot of competition on these websites. New artists have to price competitively to survive or their work won’t get noticed. You may find some great deals.

9. Local coffee houses and book stores sometimes sell the art of local artists. These types of establishments often don’t charge to display at in their stores and sometimes don’t even take a cut if a piece sales. This makes them popular places for new artists to approach. So get a cup of joe and see what art you can find for a good price.

10. While on vacation check out the local shopping instead of the big chain stores. Local tourist places love to sell local crafts and art, especially if it is related to the destination in some way. So you may find many undiscovered artists in these local shops at prices you can afford.

 


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